Frequently Asked Questions About MGMT 337 and Professor Burd
Fall 2017


What topics does MGT 337 cover?
What are the prerequisites?
Do I need to be an MIS major to do well in this course?
Is this class like other online classes?
Will we do any programming?
What activities will we do?

I've heard Professor Burd is a real hard-ass.  Is that true?
I've heard that Professor Burd retired.  If that's true, why is he still teaching MGMT 337?


What topics does MGT 337 cover?

Think of MGT 337 as four computer science courses rolled into one. A traditional computer science curriculum usually includes separate courses on CPU design and logic, computer hardware architecture, operating systems, and networks.  This class covers all of those topics in less detail.  The primary emphasis is on technical knowledge needed to acquire and configure hardware and system software infrastructure to support information and other business systems.


What are the prerequisites?

There are no formal prerequisites for MGMT 337.  However, since it's an upper-dividision managemrnt course, it's assumed that you've completed ASM preadmissionr equirements (see list below).  In addition, the more knowledge of computer hardware and software that you have coming into the class the more that you'll get out of it.  It is much easier to understand the concepts and technologies buried within the computer hardware and software if you have at least some experience with computers and software.

Recommended prerequisites include:

You won't need calculus in this course but there will be the occasional problem that requires a bit of algebra.  Also, some of the material in Chapters 3 and 4 drives math-phobic students crazy.  As for economics - some of the assignments and projects focus on making economically rational technology choices. You don't need formal economic models to complete those assignments and projects.  But it helps if you have some experience thinking about choices in terms of costs, benefits, and markets.


Do I need to be an MIS major to do well in this course?

It helps, but it isn't essential. What is essential is a general comfort level with technology, college-level math and writing abilities, keeping up with the readings and assignments, and asking for help and making extra efforts when there's something that you don't understand.

Many non-majors enroll for this course in their senior year to fill an elective requirement.  Some of them assume that online courses are easy and don't require a significant time commitment.  Neither of those assumptions is correct for this course.  Many non-majors have successfully completed this course, but they usually work harder to do so than in other ASM courses - online or face-to-face.


Is this class like other online classes?

Yes, no, or maybe - depending on what other online classes you've taken.  Feedback from students in earlier online semesters indicates the following common differences:


Will we do any programming?

No.


What activities will we do?

Activities will include readings, quizzes, assignments, projects (larger assignments), and exams.  Some of the assignments and projects will be web-based research/analysis tasks and the remainder will examine hardware/software configuration and performance in depth.  All assignments and projects will require written answers or short papers.  You'll write a lot in this course though you'll have plenty of examples to guide you, highly-structured assignments, and ample opportunities for feedback on drafts.


I've heard Professor Burd is a real hard-ass.  Is that true?

There's plenty of evidence pro and con.  For example see some of my reviews at RateMyProfessor.com.

I read my student evaluations every semester and the wide range of comments regarding my teaching and student interaction styles has always perturbed me.  Comments typically include many that praise me as accessibile and helpful and nearly as many that describe me as aloof, distant, and unsympathetic.  Both are accurate - but how is that possible?

Simply put, I have little patience for students who are underprepared, who aren't able to perceive their own knowledge gaps, and who aren't proactive in filling those gaps.  I expect you to prepare thoroughly and (as a result) to have a good grasp of what you do and don't understand.  When you do perceive a gap in your knowledge, I expect you to make a timely and thorough attempt to fill the gap. Asking me for help is part of that attempt though so are rereading chapters, interacting with your classmates, and searching out and reading supplemental material.  These are reasonable expectations for college upperclassmen and graduate students and they're essential abilities to succeed in any computer-related career.

If you're timely and thorough in your preparation and work but are still having trouble understanding the material or completing assignments, you'll find me approachable, helpful, and generous with my time and attention.  If you're un- or underprepared, consistently late, or asking for help that should have been asked for many days or weeks ago then you'll find me irritable, curt, and unsympathetic.  The choice of which "me" with whom you want to interact with is entirely yours! 


I've heard that Professor Burd retired.  If that's true, why is he still teaching MGMT 337?

I did retire from UNM on May 31, 2016 after 31+ years of full-time service.  I returned to UNM a month later on a 0.25 FTE contract with the UNM Information Assurance Scholarship for Service (SFS) Program as my primary work-related responibility.  My 2017-2018 contract duties include both the SFS program and MGMT 337.  I added MGMT 337 back into my job duties because I'm considering an 8th edtion of the textbook. Teaching MGMT 337 will enable me to determine where textbook updates are needed and to try out some updated/new material.


This page was last updated on 06/30/17